Identity Theft Victims

Identity theft victims are on the rise and as the years go by more and more people are falling into the hands of these perpetrators. Now that our economy is in recession, it is especially time to protect your identity more so than ever. Since 2002, millions of people have fallen into the hands of identity thieves. Nowadays with the newest and expanding technology development, identity thieves are finding it easier to steal someone’s information over the net. Still, the statistics have shown that family members and friends also steal identity in some instances, thus everyone is suspect when it comes to identity theft.

Identity theft victims often find it difficult to cope once their identity has been stolen. Few thieves file bankruptcy, commit additional crimes, cover a crime with the victim’s identity and the list goes on. When the victim finds that their credit report is violated by an identity thief, the victim must adhere to an ongoing battle. The credit bureaus unfortunately do not remove the actions committed by the thief; rather the bureaus often place ‘resolved, cleared,’ or what have behind the debt of bankruptcy. Thus, when creditors see the report and the Fraud Alert pending on the report they have no idea who committed the crime and often assume and this affects the victim.

When a person is victimized by a perpetrator that steals identities, it is often difficult to get back on track. The victim has to stay on his toes each day to make sure no further advantage has been taken against him. Thus, the victim must monitor is banking accounts, credit reports and any information linked to him each day.

If you are a victim of identity theft, you will immediately need to report the crime to your local authorities. Next, you will need to link to the Federal Trade Commission Consumers site and file a complaint, alerting the government that your identity was stolen. Once you complete the complaint, make sure you follow the case closely and report any new defilement to the authorities. You will also need to contact the credit bureaus and alert them that you identity was stolen. Read all the information you can about identity theft, since some states place Freezes on your credit accounts preventing access to anyone accept you. Other states only permit Fraud Alerts, which do nothing for the victim; however, the alerts stay on the reports about three months unless the perpetrator is continuingly using your identity.

Generally, when family and friends steal your identity it is often easier to catch the perpetrator, however if your identity is stolen online there is no guarantee that the perpetrator will be caught. The World Wide Net is one of the easiest places for criminals to steal or luring victims into a web of crime and hate.